FICTION

 

Linked

Throwing children of different races together will not automatically foster friendships and deep connections. It takes effort to create multiculturalism awareness. This teen novel helps to initiate discussions on diversity, stereotyping and privilege. Same age, same height, same grade—they could have been identical twins, but they were not. Yet they lived in the same imperfect world with overwhelming family problems. Greg’s father had walked out after striking his mother. Steve’s father refused to leave after repeatedly abusing his mother. Each boy, in his own way, was begging for help. They lived in different homes. They had different personalities.  One was black and the other was white and they had switched!

 

The Intruders

What does a black, a Chinese, an Italian and a Puerto Rican Bronx teen have in common?—A thirst for excitement! They get their adventure and more when they set out to explore a cave in their neighborhood.

 After falling down a ledge, the teens find that they have time-travelled three centuries into the future–in the middle of a war between tribes. Fortunately, one tribe accepts them.

 The teenagers soon find that they have a unique and thrilling advantage in the conflict. They know the land, and the tribes, who had lost most modern technology, do not. Unfortunately, within weeks, their adventure became too real as both friends and enemies are getting killed! This is no longer fun. This is war!

 

 

NON-FICTION

 

Life After High School: Traits that Help & Traits that Hurt

This no-nonsense text offers strategies for dealing with life after high school. The guide explains positive and negative traits that can help or hinder teens in their post high school life and gives readers tips to identify the path to success and avoid the route that often leads to failure.

This book is only for those who want to succeed. It’s based on the premise that if you can figure out what personality type you are, then just perhaps you can move on to figuring out how to manage your life. Another focus is the recognition that sometimes it can take years of struggle, both financial and emotional, to realize your dream. However, regardless of the issues, what is important is the decisions that you make, and the path that you take, immediately after leaving high school.

 

 

The Dangers of Medical Radiation

We worry about radiation dose at airport security systems. We worry about electromagnetic radiation from power lines and cell phones yet we are willing to tolerate the massive doses of radiation given to us by our health care providers. Protect yourselves from medical radiation and minimize your exposure. Learn about the dangers from misuse and overuse of x-ray procedures such as CT scans, fluoroscopy including heart angiograms, dental imaging, nuclear imaging and radiation therapy.

 

 

Spanish for Radiology Professionals

English to Spanish translation of often used technical terms and radiological instructions. This book can easily be used by someone with a limited knowledge of Spanish to communicate instructions to the patient and to understand simple everyday emergency situations the Spanish-speaking patient may present.

 

 

Lange Radiographic Positioning Flashcards (Lange)

A comprehensive, carry-anywhere review of routine imaging procedures, projections, and positioning terminology

Each two-sided card includes a high-quality photograph of correct patient positioning with details of the projection and the corresponding X-ray, technical information, and image evaluation criteria

Most cards include a high-resolution radiographic image and photographs demonstrating each position/projection

Great for use as a radiography procedures course review or as a clinical refresher prior to taking a patient's X-ray

 

Mammography and Breast Imaging Prep & Mammography and Breast Imaging: Just the Facts

A comprehensive educational text on breast cancer imaging, diagnosing and treatment including coverage of all breast imaging modalities and techniques.

 

 

Lange Q & A Mammography Examination

A review and self-assessment manual for radiologic technologists interested in the Advance Level Examination in Mammography.

 

LECTURER

Radiographic Imaging & Mammography Seminars

Seminars for educators, managers, radiologic science professionals, mammographers, and health care professionals involved in providing breast-imaging services.

Visit the MTMI website for details on upcoming seminars

 

EDITOR

Gannett Editor

Visit the Gannett web site for details on continuing education courses: http://www.continuingeducation.com/

 

 

Email the Author

 

 

Olive Peart is an author, an educator, radiographer and publisher.   Olive
Her technical query columns appear regularly in Radiologic Technology a journal of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists and she is the radiologic technology editor with Gannett Education. Olive also gives regular radiologic technology and mammography lectures at seminars across the US and Canada, many sponsored by Medical Technology Management Institute, MTMI.
Olive is the author of two young adult novel,Linked and The Intruders. Her other published books are: Life After High School: Traits that Help & Traits that Hurt, The Dangers of Medical Radiation; Spanish for Professionals in Radiology; Lange Q & A Mammography Examination; Mammography and Breast Imaging Prep: Program Review and Exam Prep, and Mammography and Breast Imaging-Just the Facts.

Olive was the keynote speaker at Let's Get Ready Summer Career Day Kick-Off on July 30th 2011. The mission of Let's Get Ready is to expand college access for motivated, low-income high school students. She was honored at the Juneteenth Celebration of the African American Chamber of Commerce of Westchester and Rockland Counties (NY). At its annual award dinner June 17, 2010, Olive was recognized as one of the Chamber's "10 Influential Blacks" in Westchester & Rockland Counties, for her work as an author and publisher. She founded two publishing companies: Demarche Publishing LLC, which publishes a variety of works; and DLite Press offering complete self-publishing and ebook services.

View her Award Acceptance Speech at:http://www.gather.com/viewVideo.action?id=11821949021907447

 This year Olive was selected for a RAD-AID/ASRT Foundation, Technologist Fellow outreach opportunity and will join a RAD-AID’s project team on assignment in Chandigarh, India.

Olive loves to hear from her readers and can be reached through the links below.

E-mail the Author

 

My Perspective

Low Dose, High Quality Possible by Olive Peart, M.S. R.T. (R) (M)

Radiologic Technology, 79:371-372 2008
© 2008 American Society of Radiologic Technologists

The year was 1908, and the use of radiation for both medical and recreational purposes was expanding rapidly. Circuses used the rays to guess the content of women’s bags. Shoe stores had fluoroscopy machines to help customers fit shoes. Wealthy individuals had x-ray units in their homes to entertain guests.

As time progressed, the consequences to individuals became apparent. Yet, even as scientists began documenting eye and skin ailments, the abuse of radiation continued.

The problem was that these rays could not be seen, tasted, touched, smelled or heard. It was difficult for the public to understand the dangers. Not until well into the 1950s did the many harmful practices finally cease. Even then, the effort was geared mainly toward protecting those who worked with x-rays.
Fast forward 100 years. The year is 2008. Today, a career using x-rays is absolutely safe. Technologists can enjoy the benefits of protective devices such as lead shielding and radiation monitoring. Yet concern still remains: What about the patients?
The rapid spread of multislice computed tomography (CT) scans, plus computed radiography (CR) and direct radiography (DR) in general radiography, has been great for our profession. However, these new technologies have resulted in a rapid and dangerous increase in radiation dose to patients.1 The American College of Radiology developed appropriateness criteria, recognizing that there is an immediate need to develop a nationally accepted system to assist radiologists and referring physicians in making the correct imaging decision for a given patient.2 It is hoped that, if implemented, these guidelines will protect patients by addressing one aspect of the problem — namely physicians.

Read more and other articles by Olive Peart at http://www.radiologictechnology.org/